let's go out for dinner

Hello everyone:

Which is correct or more common?

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Let's go out to/for dinner?

My ears are more accustomed đồ sộ "to" than vãn to"for".

Thanks

  • For bầm, it depends on how I'm using the term.

    "We're going out to dinner next Friday."
    "Let's go out for dinner tonight - it's too hot đồ sộ cook."

    For bầm, it depends on how I'm using the term.

    "We're going out to dinner next Friday."
    "Let's go out for dinner tonight - it's too hot đồ sộ cook."

    How about: "Let's go out to/for dinner. It's on me"?
    Thanks

    To go out to dinner usually means that one is invited somewhere, sánh it's not something one can spontaneously undertake.

    To go out for dinner usually means that one decides đồ sộ go out, rather than vãn stay in and prepare food at home page,

    For these reasons I'd be more likely đồ sộ say 'Let's go out

    for

    dinner'.

    I agree with Thomas #4, that exact distinction, and RM1#2.

    To go out to dinner usually means that one is invited somewhere, sánh it's not something one can spontaneously undertake.

    To go out for dinner usually means that one decides đồ sộ go out, rather than vãn stay in and prepare food at home page,

    For these reasons I'd be more likely đồ sộ say 'Let's go out

    for

    dinner'.

    "Let's go out đồ sộ dinner. It's on bầm."

    Anna - Page 147

    "Let's go out đồ sộ dinner. It's on bầm."

    Anna - Page 147

    I did say 'usually'. Michael Derechin is American. The conventions in AE may be different.

    The "over" examples mean the person was invited đồ sộ Tom's house, right? While the "out" ones imply a restaurant, right? If sánh, which forms bởi you prefer? "To dinner" or "for" dinner?

    Tom invited bầm

    over

    to dinner and don't know what đồ sộ say.
    Tom invited bầm

    over

    for dinner and don't know what đồ sộ say.

    Tom invited bầm

    out

    to dinner and don't know what đồ sộ say.
    Tom invited bầm

    out

    for dinner and don't know what đồ sộ say.

    The "over" examples mean the person was invited đồ sộ Tom's house, right? While the "out" ones imply a restaurant, right? If sánh, which forms bởi you prefer? "To dinner" or "for" dinner?

    Tom invited bầm

    over

    to dinner and don't know what đồ sộ say.
    Tom invited bầm

    over

    for dinner and don't know what đồ sộ say.

    Tom invited bầm

    out

    to dinner and don't know what đồ sộ say.
    Tom invited bầm

    out

    for dinner and don't know what đồ sộ say.

    Invitations are generally for an activity or đồ sộ an sự kiện or place. Meals usually use "for" in modern English. unless it is a formal occasion, in which case it would probably be given a name or a mô tả tìm kiếm. This does not mean that "for" is used with every verb, and you can certainly go out đồ sộ dinner, as has been explained above. I have a feeling that "to" used đồ sộ be more widely used than vãn it is now.

    "Over" means đồ sộ Tom's place. "Out" probably means a restaurant.

    Out for dinner used đồ sộ be very rare, but since the 1970s it has grown in use and now forms one-third of the to/for uses. See Google Books Ngram Viewer. For is somewhat more popular in Britain than vãn the USA.

    In other words, I can mix all the combinations in #9, right?

    All four are possible, but use Ngrams if you want đồ sộ see what published writers prefer.

    And would it matter if he invited bầm đồ sộ strictly dinner, that is, a meal, or đồ sộ an sự kiện including dinner?

    He invited bầm over to/for dinner.

    I think "for" sounds more casual than vãn "to".

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    The rise of "for" might come from the fact that casual dining has risen greatly over recent decades (I think). I believe in the past it was the norm for families đồ sộ mostly cook and eat dinner at home page. Going out đồ sộ dinner was often an "occasion". Now it's not sánh special much of the time. It's routine for many people. So they make the decision đồ sộ go out đồ sộ a restaurant "for" this meal instead of cooking. They haven't been invited "to" anywhere and don't have any special occasion planned.

    So if some colleagues go out đồ sộ eat something quickly during their break, they might go "for dinner", whearas if I was invited đồ sộ a celebration because of some anniversary with elegant clothes on, I would go "to dinner", right?

    That's what I would say, generally. But as said above, both uses are flexible.